• Henley DFAS

Past lectures

AGM 10.30am and Lecture 11.15am all online, Wednesday 4th November 2020

Lecturer: Mark Hill


Undressing Antiques

“Antiques. I don’t understand them and they’re beyond my budget. They’re not for me.” A persuasive introduction to buying antiques and integrating and using them in today’s homes. The state of the antiques market and the different meanings of the word value are considered, and we take a look at what current and future generations of collectors are buying, why they are buying it and how they are displaying it.

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Thursday 19th November 2020 Online at 10.30am and 2.30pm

Lecturer: Amy Orrock


Bruegel's Winter Scenes

One of the first artists to paint snow, Pieter Bruegel the Elder (c1525-1569) is known today for wintery masterpieces, such as The Hunters in the Snow, The Census at Bethlehem and The Massacre of the Innocents.

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Thursday 17th December 2020 Online at 10.30am and 2.30pm

Lecturer: David Wright


A Brief History of Wine

This lecture should be very enjoyable!

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Thursday 21st January 2021 Online at 10.30am and 2.30pm

Lecturer: Steven Desmond


The Odd Couple: The Gardens of Edwin Lutyens and Gertrude Jekyll

 

Hestercombe House and Gardens, Somerset, designed by Edward Lutyens, created by Gertrude Jekyll

In the spring of 1889 the young Edwin Lutyens, later to become the most famous British architect of the 20th century, met the artist-gardener-craftswoman Gertrude Jekyll for the first time at an afternoon tea party in rural Surrey. She was a well-known eccentric, of whom her parents had despaired, and a generation older than the young man who communicated with the world through drawings and elaborate jokes.  Lutyens found in the daunting Miss Jekyll someone who empathised with his big ideas regarding design, detailing and distinctiveness.  She opened social doors to him, and he brought her experiments in garden making onto the national stage. 

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Thursday 18th February 2021 online at 10.30am and repeated at 2.30pm

Lecturer: Mark Cottle


A Photographic Odyssey: Shackleton's Endurance Expedition Captured on Camera

 

During Ernest Shackleton's third Antarctic expedition in 1914, his ship, the Endurance, was trapped and eventually crushed in the pack ice.  After camping for five months on the ice, Shackleton's men rowed to the remote Elephant Island.  From there, Shackleton sailed for help to South Georgia over 800 miles away. Over three months later he returned to rescue the crew of the Endurance.

                                      Elephant Island                                                                                      South Georgia

                                                                        photographed by Frank Hurley

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Thursday 18th March 2021 Online at 10.30am and 2.30pm

Lecturer: Fenella Bazin


The Bayeux Tapestry

Although the images of the Bayeux Tapestry are so familiar, the stories behind the work are much less known. The account of the Battle of Hastings is only a small part of this extraordinary work.

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Thursday 15th April 2021 Online at 10.30am and 2.30pm

Lecturer: Jo Walton


'So! They Do Cook After All! Ravilious, Bawden and the Great Bardfield Artists

 

In 1932 the artist Edward Bawden and his wife Charlotte moved into Brick House in the Essex village of Great Bardfield, initially sharing the house with another artistic couple, Eric Ravilious and Tirzah Garwood. 

 

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Thursday 20th May 2021 Online at 10.30am and 2.30pm

Lecturer: Peter Medhurst


The Genius of Beethoven Lecture
This lecture is affiliated to the Special Interest Day on Wednesday 9th June.  Click here to go straight to that page.
 
Famously, every morning of his adult life, Beethoven measured out exactly 60 coffee beans for his breakfast.  A man who is capable of such discipline over a cup of coffee can surely apply that exactness elsewhere in his life;  and in Beethoven's case, it was applied to his compositions. 

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Thursday 17th June 2021 at 10.45am and 2.15pm or online t 10.30am if necessary.

Lecturer: Pamela Campbell-Johnston


The Art of 1935

Can a single year adequately encapsulate an artistic environment in British art history? This lecture, The Art of 1935, explores that year’s many aspects of decorative and fine art, demonstrating how these artistic forms reflected the period in a fitting and cohesive manner. 

Set against the backdrop of the 1935 Silver Jubilee Celebrations of King George V and Queen Mary, audiences are transported back to this fabulous time and learn about this pivotal year.

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Thursday 15th July 2021 online at 10.30am repeated at 2.30pm

Lecturer: Dr Geri Parlby


Shock! Horror! Probe! The Art and Artifice of Fleet Street: A Newspaper Story in Pictures

Thursday 16th September 2021 at 10.45am and 2.15pm live at Phyllis Court

Lecturer: Matthew Williams


Ghastly Good Taste - The Highs and Lows of British Interior Design 1880 - 1980

This lecture looks at the enormous changes in our homes over a hundred year period, encompassing aspects of household taste from Victorian clutter to the psychedelic ‘throw away’ furnishings of the 1970s.

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Thursday 21st October 2021 at Phyllis Court 10.45am and 2.15pm

Lecturer: Colin Pink


Gustav Klimt and Fin de Siècle Vienna Society
 
 
Turn of the century Vienna was a melting pot of new ideas in science (Hertz and  Boltzmann);
 
philosophy (Ludwig Wittgenstein);
 
psychoanalysis (Sigmund Freud);
 
modernist architecture (Otto Wagner and Adolf Loos);
 
twelve tone music (Arnold Schoenberg, Alban Berg and Anton Webern);
 
modernist literature (Karl Kraus, Robert Musil and Arthur Schnitzler);
 
and in art (Klimt, Kokoschka and Schiele).

 

Gustav Klimt led the Secession movement, which broke free from nineteenth century academic art, to create a highly decorative and potent form of imagery, drawing inspiration from art nouveau, symbolism, Byzantine and Mycenaean art.

Klimt created a highly decorative and sensual visualization that explored the power of sex in the age of Freud. We will examine the ramifications of Klimt’s sexually charged images in the context of Viennese art and society.

 

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